Category Archives: Video

Guest Post – Bob Myers Intro to Video, Nestingen on “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling”

Editor’s Note:

When I saw Bob Myers sharing this video on Facebook, I wanted to provide an introduction and promo for it here but did not have the time. Bob graciously agreed to do this for me, and Got ‘Er Done  the same day. Thanks Bob!

Bob is retired from the U. S. Navy and the U. S. Navy Blue Angels. He describes himself on Facebook as a “Son, husband, father, grandfather, brother, beggar at the Lord’s table.” When my wife and I were heading to vacation at Navarre Beach this past March, he hospitably invited us to his church, Immanuel Lutheran Church in Pensacola, Florida. We were blessed by two services there during the week, and Bob presented me with a set of his Small Catechism memory cards and Yshnog. Bob is alway doing stuff to spread and strengthen the faith.

Here’s Bob’s intro and promo …

Luther’s Small Catechism is a confession of faith that I have come to love in the years since becoming a Lutheran as an adult.

These basics of Christian doctrine, what some have called “the Layman’s Bible,” teach us in a condensed version what we are to do and what we are not to do in the first chief part, and then in the subsequent parts are shown who God is and what God has done for us.

God’s gift of the internet gives the modern parent or grandparent precious resources for our use in teaching the faith. We can search for papers and articles, videos and presentations that help us “hand over the goods.” I’ve been able to use a series from the Higher Things organization called “Video Catechism” to prepare lessons and to teach 6th-8th grade students the basics of the faith.

While searching YouTube for resources and presentations I came across this gem posted by Lutherske Fordypningsdager. My computer translates Lutherske Fordypningsdager as “Lutheran Specialization Days.” It is an annual forum in Norway to promote the central and life-giving truths of the classical Lutheran confession of faith. Their focus is on the proclamation of the Word of God in law and gospel. They have attendees from a variety of denominations and confessions of faith. This lecture was from the 2015 forum.

The video, “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling” by Dr. James A. Nestingen, takes a look inside the first three parts of the catechism. He reminds us that we are creatures of God, and who we are as creatures of God, and who we are in Christ Jesus. To watch and listen to Dr. Nestingen is to witness a man clearly and lovingly confess the faith. His skillful weaving of story into what he teaches helps the listener remember what he has been taught. It also models for us what it looks like, what it sounds like, to teach the faith. Built on the framework that is the confession that we learn by heart, we’re given examples to help us pass on that faith.

Video — The Lord’s Prayer in a Cardboard Box,

Garrick Matthew Miller Halvorson, aka Gunny, decided he was going to sleep in a cardboard box that night.

Dad still comes in to pray the Lord’s Prayer with him. In the midst of the informality of bedding down in a cardboard box, Gunny still knows what reverence is, and his father shows him that prayer fits in everywhere.

 

Video — Dad and Mom Praying the Lord’s Prayer with Children at Bedtime

Here is a video of Leif and Kim Halvorson praying the Lord’s Prayer with their three children at bedtime.

Dads, as you can see, this takes hardly any time. To be exact, 39 seconds! Yet it has a tremendous impact. It has impact because:

A. The Lord’s Prayer is God’s Word, and God’s Word does stuff. It is quick and powerful. It does not return to the Lord void, but it accomplishes the purpose for which He has sent it.

B. The influence of fathers and mothers is built into nature, and thereafter happens all by itself, simply by your act of doing.

Video – High Chair Catechization of 2.5 Year Old

Facebook group member Pastor Matt Lorfeld his wife Heidi Lorfeld provide this video showing catechization of their 2-1/2 year old son while eating in the high chair.

He is learning the 1st and 4th Commandments.

This illustrates a father catechizing in the home, catechizing a young child, and fitting catechization into ordinary activities.

Video — Lord’s Prayer Puzzle Idea Catching On, Nicole Schulert

Facebook group member Nicole Schulert posted in the group:

Thanks for the Lord’s Prayer idea! We did it with a stopwatch for fun. Since we only have one strong reader so far, it took 3m40s to put it in order, but they can’t wait to try again tomorrow.

She was referring to a post by another Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton. Melissa has a creative method for teaching her young son the Lord’s Prayer. She printed the prayer and sliced it into a little more than a dozen ribbons of paper. Each ribbon has a portion of the prayer. Then she asks her son to find the ribbon that begins the prayer, When he finds it, he moves that ribbon into a second column, and she has him read what is printed on it,

Then she asks him, “What’s next?” He sifts through the remaining ribbons to find the one that has the next part of the prayer. He moves that ribbon into the second column, and she has him read what is on that ribbon. You can see her video and the blog post about it here.

There can be variations in how this is done, and it is also nice to see how it works out with children in a group and children of different ages. So we asked Nichole to video her use of the Lord’s Prayer puzzle. She generously did that for us, and shares it with you below.

Video – Mom leads young children in closing of daily devotions – Creed, Lord’s Prayer, Reading, and Morning Prayer

This is a third video of home devotions by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

The three videos together illustrate a complete home devotion in the morning The first video showed the opening of daily devotions. The second video showed memory work, with mom helping two young children memorize the Third Article of the Creed, its meaning, the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the First Petition.

Now this video shows the closing of the daily devotion with confessing the Creed, praying the Lord’s prayer, a brief reading for the day, and Dr. Martin Luther’s Morning Prayer from the Small Catechism.

In all, the three videos last only about 16 ½ minutes. From the aspect of time, this is a very doable approach to a daily devotion, and yet in that short amount of time, many things are being learned.

 

Video – Mom helps young children memorize Third Article, Lord’s Prayer Introduction & 1st Petition

This is another encouraging video of home catechization provided to us by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

In this video, we see that young children can learn to memorize the Catechism. A very young boy recites the Third Article and its meaning. He and his older sister recite the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the Second Petition.

All young children need prompts when learning to recite the Catechism from memory. It is interesting in this video how mom uses both verbal and sign prompts.

Melissa is taking advantage of a pedagogical truth that was expressed by G. H. Gerberding in these words:

The child must be instructed. Begin early. Let it learn to pray as soon as it can speak. … We quote again from Luthardt: ‘Let it not be objected that the child cannot understand the prayer. The way of education is by practice to understanding, not by understanding to practice.

H. Gerberding, The Way of Salvation in the Lutheran Church, pp. 49-50 (Philadelphia: Lutheran Publication Society, 1887).

Even quite young children have some understanding of the words when they first begin to memorize them. After they have the words well fixed in their minds by repeated practice, more and more meaning comes to them.

Video – Mom leads two young children in opening of daily devotions – “Hey, I can do that!”

For many of us, video is such a good way to learn not only how to do things, but more basically, that we can do it.

The thought of fixing our home’s propane furnace intimidated me. But we have YouTube. Seeing it done did two things for me:

1.   It got me over the psychological hump of being fearful I could not do it.

2.   It let me understand some of the terminology and procedures described in written instructions.

These benefits, and more, also happen when we see video of things like Morning Prayer in the home. That is why it is such a blessing that member of our Facebook group, Melissa Sutton, has given us this video of leading her two young children in daily opening devotions.

In this video, you will see a nice, simple order for opening devotions in the home . You will see Melissa and her children incorporate some American Sign Language signs, and some signs the kids made up. Isn’t that neat? The kids make up their own signs!

If you haven’t tried leading devotions with your children, see if, after you watch this video, one of your reactions isn’t, “Hey, I can do that!

Of course, we don’t all have to do it the same way. Melissa shows us a good way. There are others. When our grandchildren visit and stay over, we use the format that Dr. Martin Luther provided in the Small Catechism for Evening Prayer and Morning Prayer. It is very simple, toadaly doable.

In coming days, we also will get the chance to see Melissa with her children in the closing of devotions and in memory work.

 

Video — Mom has creative and simple method to teach the Lord’s Prayer to her young son

Facebook group member Melissa Sutton has a creative method for teaching her young son the Lord’s Prayer. When I first saw this video, I thought, “That is as slick as greased lightning! Why haven’t I ever seen that before?”

She printed the prayer and sliced it into a little more than a dozen ribbons of paper. Each ribbon has a portion of the prayer. Then she asks her son to find the ribbon that begins the prayer, When he finds it, he moves that ribbon into a second column, and she has him read what is printed on it,

Then she asks him, “What’s next?” He sifts through the remaining ribbons to find the one that has the next part of the prayer. He moves that ribbon into the second column, and she has him read what is on that ribbon.

This sequence of “What’s next,” moving the ribbon, and reading it is continued until he has assembled the whole prayer.

She frequently encourages him. When he finds the right ribbon that has the next part of the prayer, she usually says something like, “Good job!”

This is a pretty ingenious teaching method. Moms, please try this and give us your feedback. We’d especially like to see all the videos of this and other methods of teaching the Catechism that we can get our hands on.

And Dads, there is no reason why you shouldn’t or couldn’t be doing this too. It is as simple as falling off a log, and we all can do that.