Category Archives: Prayer

Guest Post – Bob Myers Intro to Video, Nestingen on “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling”

Editor’s Note:

When I saw Bob Myers sharing this video on Facebook, I wanted to provide an introduction and promo for it here but did not have the time. Bob graciously agreed to do this for me, and Got ‘Er Done  the same day. Thanks Bob!

Bob is retired from the U. S. Navy and the U. S. Navy Blue Angels. He describes himself on Facebook as a “Son, husband, father, grandfather, brother, beggar at the Lord’s table.” When my wife and I were heading to vacation at Navarre Beach this past March, he hospitably invited us to his church, Immanuel Lutheran Church in Pensacola, Florida. We were blessed by two services there during the week, and Bob presented me with a set of his Small Catechism memory cards and Yshnog. Bob is alway doing stuff to spread and strengthen the faith.

Here’s Bob’s intro and promo …

Luther’s Small Catechism is a confession of faith that I have come to love in the years since becoming a Lutheran as an adult.

These basics of Christian doctrine, what some have called “the Layman’s Bible,” teach us in a condensed version what we are to do and what we are not to do in the first chief part, and then in the subsequent parts are shown who God is and what God has done for us.

God’s gift of the internet gives the modern parent or grandparent precious resources for our use in teaching the faith. We can search for papers and articles, videos and presentations that help us “hand over the goods.” I’ve been able to use a series from the Higher Things organization called “Video Catechism” to prepare lessons and to teach 6th-8th grade students the basics of the faith.

While searching YouTube for resources and presentations I came across this gem posted by Lutherske Fordypningsdager. My computer translates Lutherske Fordypningsdager as “Lutheran Specialization Days.” It is an annual forum in Norway to promote the central and life-giving truths of the classical Lutheran confession of faith. Their focus is on the proclamation of the Word of God in law and gospel. They have attendees from a variety of denominations and confessions of faith. This lecture was from the 2015 forum.

The video, “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling” by Dr. James A. Nestingen, takes a look inside the first three parts of the catechism. He reminds us that we are creatures of God, and who we are as creatures of God, and who we are in Christ Jesus. To watch and listen to Dr. Nestingen is to witness a man clearly and lovingly confess the faith. His skillful weaving of story into what he teaches helps the listener remember what he has been taught. It also models for us what it looks like, what it sounds like, to teach the faith. Built on the framework that is the confession that we learn by heart, we’re given examples to help us pass on that faith.

Preview of Praying Luther’s Small Catechism: The Pattern of Sound Words, by John T. Pless

Click the link here for a PDF preview of Praying Luther’s Small Catechism: The Pattern of Sound Words, by John T. Pless, scheduled to be released by CPH this July.

Some of the Table of Contents:

Chapter 1:  Praying the Catechism

Chapter 2:  The Ten Commandments: An Agenda for Christian Prayer

Chapter 3:  The Apostles’ Creed: The Trinitarian Shape of Christian Prayer

Chapter 4:  The Lord’s Prayer: Prayer under the Pressure of the Cross

Chapter 5:  Holy Baptism: Calling on the Name Given Us

Chapter 6:  Confession, Absolution, the Office of the Keys: Absolution Opens Lips for Prayer

Chapter 7:  The Sacrament of the Altar: The Promise from which Prayer Flows

Chapter 8:  Give Us Our Daily Bread: Morning, Evening, and Mealtime

Chapter 9:  Table of Duties: Prayer in Our Callings

Appendices

1.  The Catechism as the Handbook for the Vocation of the Laity in Worship and Prayer

2.  Morning and Evening Prayers as Reflctions of the Our Father

3.  The Psalms Organized according to the Lord’s Prayer

4.  Preparation for Confession for Confession and Absolution According to the Ten Commandments

Video — The Lord’s Prayer in a Cardboard Box,

Garrick Matthew Miller Halvorson, aka Gunny, decided he was going to sleep in a cardboard box that night.

Dad still comes in to pray the Lord’s Prayer with him. In the midst of the informality of bedding down in a cardboard box, Gunny still knows what reverence is, and his father shows him that prayer fits in everywhere.

 

Video — Dad and Mom Praying the Lord’s Prayer with Children at Bedtime

Here is a video of Leif and Kim Halvorson praying the Lord’s Prayer with their three children at bedtime.

Dads, as you can see, this takes hardly any time. To be exact, 39 seconds! Yet it has a tremendous impact. It has impact because:

A. The Lord’s Prayer is God’s Word, and God’s Word does stuff. It is quick and powerful. It does not return to the Lord void, but it accomplishes the purpose for which He has sent it.

B. The influence of fathers and mothers is built into nature, and thereafter happens all by itself, simply by your act of doing.

God Hears Me Pray — Free Prayer Folder for Children

LutheranCatechism.com has created a little folder of prayers that children can pray, titled “God Hears Me Pray.” This resources is a two-page PDF file. Download it. Print one page on one side of ordinary letter sized card stock, and the other page on the other side. Then fold it in the manner that a church bulletin might be folded.

The folder is illustrated in the photographs at the bottom of this post.

This folder starts on the front page as folded with three scriptures comforting children that God loves to hear them pray.

God loves to hear you pray

The Kingdom of Heaven belongs to little children.
Jesus said, “Let the little children come to Me.”
Your angels always see the face of your Father in heaven.

Then it presents the Lord’s Prayer, after telling them that Dr. Luther said, “God loves to hear it.”

On the back page as folded, it provides:

  • Morning Prayer
  • Evening Prayer
  • Before Eating
  • After Eating

On the two inside pages it provides:

  • Thanksgiving for Baptism
  • Baptized Life
  • Mercy
  • Confession and Forgiveness
  • Lamb of God
  • Glory
  • Thanksgiving for Parents
  • Duty of Children
  • Preachers and Teachers
  • Repentance
  • Thanks and Trust
  • Be Near
  • Little Sparrow

This assortment of prayers shows children how they can prayer prayers from Luther’s Small Catechism, from the liturgy, from customary prayers that have been popular in the Lutheran church, and that keep them conscious of their Baptism. It helps prepare children for their participation in and understanding of the Divine Service.

Prayer Book – “Pray for Children”

LutheranCatechism.com has produced a book of prayers titled, Pray for Children. Following are the preface and listing of prayer topics covered. The book itself can be downloaded here.

Preface

Jesus said:

“Take heed that you do not despise one of these little ones, for I say to you that in heaven their angels always see the face of My Father who is in heaven. For the Son of Man has come to save that which was lost.” Matthew 18:10-11.

So we should pray for our children, our grandchildren, and the children of our congregations; and the Father loves to hear our prayers for them.

Therefore LutheranCatechism.com has gathered these prayers. They help you put words to your concerns for children, and speak your concerns to our Heavenly Father.

Many of these prayers are old. They use old-fashioned language. No attempt has been made in this edition of Pray for Children to update language. You can use them as they are, or you can modernize the language when using them. That won’t be hard to do.

Should a qualified person or group of people want to modernize these prayers, LutheranCatechism.com would be happy to help that happen, and would be happy to publish a revised edition.

This is a first effort, and LutheranCatechism.com would appreciate you sending us more prayers for children that you might have or come across.

It is grievous that we have no prayers in three areas: (1) for conception, (2) for adoption, and (3) for cases of miscarriage. Children are gifts from God, by which He blesses us and by which He grows his kingdom. Miscarriage, difficulties with conception, and difficulties with adoption are troubling experiences and ones where we should have help in resorting to God in prayer. Please, if you find prayers in these areas, we especially would appreciate those.

Contents

  1. Conception
  2. Adoption
  3. Pregnancy
  4. Miscarriage
  5. Stillbirth
  6. Birth
  7. Baptism
  8. Sponsors
  9. Catechumens
  10. Confirmation
  11. Home and Family
  12. Absence
  13. Sickness
  14. Leaving Home
  15. Children of the Congregation
  16. Erring, Wayward, Crisis
  17. Praying Scriptures

Video – Mom leads young children in closing of daily devotions – Creed, Lord’s Prayer, Reading, and Morning Prayer

This is a third video of home devotions by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

The three videos together illustrate a complete home devotion in the morning The first video showed the opening of daily devotions. The second video showed memory work, with mom helping two young children memorize the Third Article of the Creed, its meaning, the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the First Petition.

Now this video shows the closing of the daily devotion with confessing the Creed, praying the Lord’s prayer, a brief reading for the day, and Dr. Martin Luther’s Morning Prayer from the Small Catechism.

In all, the three videos last only about 16 ½ minutes. From the aspect of time, this is a very doable approach to a daily devotion, and yet in that short amount of time, many things are being learned.

 

Begin early. Children learn by practice to understanding

“The child must be instructed. Begin early. Let it learn to pray as soon as it can speak. … We quote again from Luthardt: ‘Let it not be objected that the child cannot understand the prayer. The way of education is by practice to understanding, not by understanding to practice.”

G. H. Gerberding, The Way of Salvation in the Lutheran Church, pp. 49-50 (Philadelphia: Lutheran Publication Society, 1887).