Category Archives: Memorization

Catechism Memory Cards — Two Styles — Fourth Translation

Previously, LutheranCatechism.com released one style of Small Catechism Memory Cards in three different translations. The style was standard size 3″ x 5″ index cards with both the question and the answer for each portion of the Catechism on one side. The translations were 2010 Sola Publishing / ReClaim Resources, 1979 NPH-WELS, and 2001 ELS.

Today, LutheranCatechism.com releases Small Catechism Memory Cards in a fourth translation, the 1912 Synodical Conference translation, and in two styles. One of the styles is the same index card format. The new style is enhanced with:

  • post card size
  • graphical design enhancements
  • questions on one side, answers on the other

This beautiful style has been created by graphics designer, Kris Brown of Kris Brown Designs.

The post card sized style is distributed in two versions, one with cut lines and the other without cut lines, as the user might prefer.

These free resources let anyone print memory cards, each containing a portion of Luther’s Small Catechism, to use as a memorization aid, for teaching children, or for meditation and prayer. Simply download the free PDF file containing the cards and an instructions file from the distribution page. Then follow the instructions to print and separate the cards.

Australian Congregation Provides Free Catechism Memory Cards Resources

Ringwood Knox Lutheran Parish, Melbourne, Australia provides free resources for anyone to create Catechism memory cards covering

  • The Lord’s Prayer
  • The Apostles Creed
  • TheTen Commandments

You will find these under Resources | Education on the Parish’s website, here.

Here is an example, the meaning of the Third Article.

Free – ELS Version of Small Catechism Memory Cards – 3rd in Series

LutheranCatechism.com Releases Third Version of Free Small Catechism Memory Cards

New Version Uses Evangelical Lutheran Synod Translation of the Small Catechism

Sidney, Montana. February 23, 2016.  LutheranCatechism.com announces the third release of Small Catechism Memory Cards. This release uses the Evangelical Lutheran Synod translation of the Small Catechism.

Translations in the series now include 2010 Sola Publishing/ReClaim Resources, 1979 NPH-WELS, and 2001 ELS.

This free resource lets anyone print standard size 3” x 5” index cards, each containing a portion of Luther’s Small Catechism to use as a memorization aid, for teaching children, or for meditation and prayer. Simply download the free PDF file containing the cards and an instructions file. Then follow the instructions to print and separate the cards.

See the whole Press Release here.

A Case of Cases for Catechism Memory Cards

Today’s arrival, one of three cases of index card cases ordered from Amazon.

Case of Memory Card Cases

As Christian Education Director of my congregation, Trinity Lutheran Church (LCMS), Sidney, Montana, I have created a set of Small Catechism Memory Cards to give away to our children and their parents, primarily, but also to everyone else in the congregation who would like to have a set. The cards will be packaged in these index card cases.

This version of Small Catechism Memory Cards uses the synodical translation, so as to adhere to Dr. Luther’s pedagogical admonition to stick to a single text in all the uses of the Catechism in the congregation. The congregation uses the 1986 CPH translation in the Lutheran Service Book, in Wednesday School, in Sunday School, in Confirmation instruction, in the high school group, and so on. So it is important in following Luther with regard to Luther’s Catechism to use this text consistently throughout everything we do in the congregation and the homes of the congregation.

Please pray with us that these Small Catechism Memory Cards will confirm to the hearts of our children the truth and assurance of the redemption we have in Jesus.

LutheranCatechism.com cannot provide this resource freely to the world as we do the 2010 Sola Publishing / ReClaim Resources translation, the 1979 NPH-WELS translation, the forthcoming 2001 ELS translation, nor the forthcoming 1912 Synodical Conference translation.

As Captain Richard Sharpe said, “I’ll do what I can, when I can, if I can.” I can do this within the congregation for the children under my charge in my vocation as Christian Education Director, and it is a pleasure and a privilege to do it.

“Freely you have received, freely give.” Matthew 10:8. From the clutches of the Devil, the world, and my sinful self, the Word of God has delivered me. This Catechism – this Layman’s Little Bible – is able to deliver these needy children in my congregation.

Press Release – Free – NPH-WELS Version of Small Catechism Memory Cards

LutheranCatechism.com Releases Second Version of Free Small Catechism Memory Cards

New Version Uses Northwestern Publishing House/WELS Translation of the Small Catechism

Sidney, Montana. February 16, 2016.  LutheranCatechism.com announces the second release of Small Catechism Memory Cards. This release uses the Northwestern Publishing House/Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod translation of the Small Catechism. This free resource lets anyone print standard size 3” x 5” index cards, each containing a portion of Luther’s Small Catechism to use as a memorization aid, for teaching children, or for meditation and prayer.

See the whole Press Release here.

Go to the Memory Cards distribution page here.

 

Getting Ready for Small Catechism Memory Cards

LutheranCatechism.com has released the 2010 Sola Publishing / ReClaim Resources version of 3″ x 5″ simplex (one-sided printing) Small Catechism Memory Cards.

In the coming weeks, we will be releasing more versions with more English translations of the Small Catechism.

We also are working on enhanced versions in a larger, postcard sized dimension. This size will allow room for graphics, larger print for the longer passages such as Morning Prayer, and will be printable in duplex. Duplex means two-sided printing. This lets us put the questions on one side and the answers on the other side of the cards.

Because these aspirations are becoming tangible, it is time to get ready for your own Small Catechism Memory Cards.

Amazon sells some nice, inexpensive index card cases that are a good fit for the number of cards in the Small Catechism Memory Cards sets. The following photos illustrate how nice they can be with the cards. Envision yourself making a set of cards and giving them in a case like this to your baptismal sponsored child, your own children, your grandchildren, your Sunday School students, or to your self.

     

Press Release – Free – Small Catechism Memory Cards Download, Sola/ReClaim Version

Press Release

LutheranCatechism.com Releases Free Small Catechism Memory Cards

First Version Uses The 2010 Sola/ReClaim Edition of the Small Catechism

Sidney, Montana. February 9, 2016.  LutheranCatechism.com announces the release of Small Catechism Memory Cards. This free resource lets anyone print standard size 3” x 5” index cards, each containing a portion of Luther’s Small Catechism to use as a memorization aid, for teaching children, or for meditation and prayer.

See the whole Press Release here.

Video – Mom leads young children in closing of daily devotions – Creed, Lord’s Prayer, Reading, and Morning Prayer

This is a third video of home devotions by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

The three videos together illustrate a complete home devotion in the morning The first video showed the opening of daily devotions. The second video showed memory work, with mom helping two young children memorize the Third Article of the Creed, its meaning, the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the First Petition.

Now this video shows the closing of the daily devotion with confessing the Creed, praying the Lord’s prayer, a brief reading for the day, and Dr. Martin Luther’s Morning Prayer from the Small Catechism.

In all, the three videos last only about 16 ½ minutes. From the aspect of time, this is a very doable approach to a daily devotion, and yet in that short amount of time, many things are being learned.

 

Why Memorize the Catechism?

The Small Catechism is not just information. It is not a systematic theology. The Catechism does not just say something. The Catechism does something.  It does something to us.

The subtitles of a book sum it up. John Nicholas Lenker gave his book, Luther’s Catechetical Writings, a first subtitle:

GOD’S CALL TO REPENTANCE, FAITH, AND PRAYER

His second subtitle is:

THE BIBLE PLAN OF SALVATION EXPLAINED BY LUTHER

The Catechism calls us to repent. It calls us to believe. It calls us to pray.

After the Word and Sacrament ministries of the Pastor, the Catechism and the Liturgy are most powerful and the most recurring engagements of believers with the truths of Scripture that are able to make one, from childhood, “wise for salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.” (2 Timothy 3:15)

Joseph Stump said, “Catechization … must not be simply mental instruction, but training for a Christian life of faith.”

Albrecht Peters wrote:

The catechism is basic. … [I]t desires to make the center of Scripture … fruitful for daily life. By doing so, it desires to hammer into us what is decisive in life and death for our salvation. … Time and again it remains impressive how little is truly decisive for salvation and, at the same time, how infinitely much this “little” is.

In his preface to the Large Catechism, Luther spoke of many pastors and theologians who were lazy toward the Catechism. By their example they led people to be lazy. They gave reasons why they no longer needed to read the Catechism, to memorize it, to recite it, to pray it. Luther said,

But for myself I say this: I am also a doctor and preacher, yea, as learned and experienced as all those may be who have such presumption and security; yet I do as a child who is being taught the Catechism, and every morning, and whenever I have time, I read and say, word for word, the Ten Commandments, the Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, the Psalms, etc. And I must still read and study daily, and yet I cannot master it as I wish, 8] but must remain a child and pupil of the Catechism, and am glad so to remain.

The Catechism keeps teaching. It keeps calling to repentance, faith, and prayer. It is a mine who precious metals never can be fully dug out. That is why we should memorize it. By having a hold on its words, God’s Word gains a hold on us, and we receive the inexhaustible treasures of repentance, faith, and prayer.

Guest Post – On My Heart, a Lutheran memory work program, Amanda Moldstad

Editor’s Introduction:

Dr. Martin Luther said, “Let every one know therefore, that it is his duty … to bring up his children above all things in the fear and knowledge of God.”

A beautiful tool to help parents with this is  On My Heart, a Lutheran memory work program. This is nifty. What’s more, it is free.

LutheranCatechism.com had to spread the word about this jewel, so we invited Amanda Moldstad to contribute the following Guest Post. Thank you, Amanda, for this outstanding gift to the Church and home, and for this Guest Post.

On My Heart

As Christian parents, we are given the task of training up our children in the truths of God’s word. One tool we use to accomplish this in our home is a memory work program we developed several years ago called On My Heart. We have made On My Heart available for free download at on-my-heart.com, and we hope it can be a blessing to many other families and congregations.

On My Heart is organized as a two-year cycle, broken into four 15-week semesters. Each week, children memorize content in four areas: the books of the Bible, Luther’s Small Catechism, Bible verses, and the Old and New Testament timelines.

The books of the Bible are taught in their entirety each semester and are the easiest area to memorize; children as young as two or three years of age can begin to recite their Bible books. Luther’s Small Catechism, with explanations, is covered over four semesters: the Ten Commandments; the Creed; the Sacraments, Keys, and Confession; and the Lord’s Prayer. We consider this to be the centerpiece of On My Heart, and the main reason why we created the program. Unless deliberate action is taken, children often are not thoroughly exposed to the areas of the Catechism until they reach confirmation class. We want our children to grow up knowing the doctrines of their faith! Sixty Bible verses are taught over the course of the program, roughly matched to the Catechism section each week. Finally, On My Heart covers the main events of the Old Testament timeline in semesters 1 and 3, and the New Testament timeline in semesters 2 and 4. We have found great value in giving our children a chronological view of Bible events—something that often fails to be communicated in standard Sunday school lessons. We also use motions with our timelines to make them more memorable and fun; a list of suggested motions can be found in the brief teacher’s guide included in the download.

We currently use On My Heart as a teaching tool for our own children at home. In the past we have also used it as a Sunday school opener at church. Presenting the new memory work and giving a brief summary of the timeline events for the week can be done in about 15 minutes. Children can recite the past week’s memory work before or after Sunday school if their families work on it at home during the week. Even for those families that don’t choose to review the content with their children at home, there is still great benefit in being exposed to the doctrines of their faith, hearing the Bible verses and stories, and reciting the books of the Bible each week. It has been our experience that at the very least, everyone regularly in attendance will learn the Bible books.

We have laid out the content of the On My Heart program on cards that can be printed, cut, and assembled on binder rings. The .pdf files are available for free download at on-my-heart.com, and you can find more thorough instructions for use there. The rings can be prepared and handed out to families at the beginning of the semester. If you are making a large batch for Sunday school use, be sure to allow plenty of time for assembly. Included in your download is a curriculum guide that also contains the full content of the program; it can be used on its own if you prefer not to make the rings.

We hope that On My Heart can be a blessing to your family or congregation!