Category Archives: Lectures

Man, You Should Have Been There for the Perfect Wave — Raising our Children in the Truth

One of my favorite films to watch with our sons is The Endless Summer. This is a fun film about some California surfers who live the dream of traveling around the world in search of the perfect wave. They go from beach to beach, island to island, ocean to ocean and continent to continent, including places where there is supposed to be no surfing, but they find surfing. Time and again, when they arrive and explain to the locals what they are doing, someone says, “You guys really missed it. You should have been here yesterday!” or “You should have been here last week!” The locals describe the perfect wave that was there earlier.

I got that feeling today when I saw a paper delivered by Pastor Rolf D. Preus at Conference XVII of the Consortium for Classical Lutheran Education, July 11-13, 2017. The conference theme was “Classical Lutheran Education: A Pedagogy of Truth.” Pastor Preus titled his paper “Raising our Children in Truth.” Man, I should have been there. That was the perfect wave.

So LutheranCatechism.com presents it here for all of you surfers who should have been there too. To access this paper in PDF format, click here.

Guest Post – Bob Myers Intro to Video, Nestingen on “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling”

Editor’s Note:

When I saw Bob Myers sharing this video on Facebook, I wanted to provide an introduction and promo for it here but did not have the time. Bob graciously agreed to do this for me, and Got ‘Er Done  the same day. Thanks Bob!

Bob is retired from the U. S. Navy and the U. S. Navy Blue Angels. He describes himself on Facebook as a “Son, husband, father, grandfather, brother, beggar at the Lord’s table.” When my wife and I were heading to vacation at Navarre Beach this past March, he hospitably invited us to his church, Immanuel Lutheran Church in Pensacola, Florida. We were blessed by two services there during the week, and Bob presented me with a set of his Small Catechism memory cards and Yshnog. Bob is alway doing stuff to spread and strengthen the faith.

Here’s Bob’s intro and promo …

Luther’s Small Catechism is a confession of faith that I have come to love in the years since becoming a Lutheran as an adult.

These basics of Christian doctrine, what some have called “the Layman’s Bible,” teach us in a condensed version what we are to do and what we are not to do in the first chief part, and then in the subsequent parts are shown who God is and what God has done for us.

God’s gift of the internet gives the modern parent or grandparent precious resources for our use in teaching the faith. We can search for papers and articles, videos and presentations that help us “hand over the goods.” I’ve been able to use a series from the Higher Things organization called “Video Catechism” to prepare lessons and to teach 6th-8th grade students the basics of the faith.

While searching YouTube for resources and presentations I came across this gem posted by Lutherske Fordypningsdager. My computer translates Lutherske Fordypningsdager as “Lutheran Specialization Days.” It is an annual forum in Norway to promote the central and life-giving truths of the classical Lutheran confession of faith. Their focus is on the proclamation of the Word of God in law and gospel. They have attendees from a variety of denominations and confessions of faith. This lecture was from the 2015 forum.

The video, “The Catechism as handbook for the Christian’s worship, prayer, and calling” by Dr. James A. Nestingen, takes a look inside the first three parts of the catechism. He reminds us that we are creatures of God, and who we are as creatures of God, and who we are in Christ Jesus. To watch and listen to Dr. Nestingen is to witness a man clearly and lovingly confess the faith. His skillful weaving of story into what he teaches helps the listener remember what he has been taught. It also models for us what it looks like, what it sounds like, to teach the faith. Built on the framework that is the confession that we learn by heart, we’re given examples to help us pass on that faith.

Power Point File — “Reformation Catechesis: Then & Now,” John T. Pless at 2016 BJS Conference

You can get the Power Point of the presentation, “Reformation Catechesis: Then & Now,” by Dr. John T. Pless at the 2016 Brothers of John the Steadfast Conference held this weekend in Tomball, Texas as a file in two Facebook groups.

For a sampling, see the post, Catechesis Quotes from John T. Pless at 2016 BJS Conference.

 

 

Catechesis Quotes from John T. Pless at 2016 BJS Conference

John T Pless at 2016 BJS ConferenceQuotations from John T. Pless speaking at the 2016 Brothers of John the Steadfast Conference in Tomball, Texas, as reported by Cafe’ Sola on Facebook.

“The small Catechism has been influential in bringing whole congregations into the Lutheran faith.”

“Even non Lutherans were using the Small Catechism for mission work!”

“A full 1/4th of the Lutheran pastors were dismissed after the (Saxon) visitation.”

“There is rhyme and reason to why Luther structured the Catechism the way he did, starting with the 10 Commandments.”

“Where is the faith transmitted? In God’s own small group, the family!”

“The antinomian controversy … it started in 1520, and it hasn’t ended yet!”

Audio of 7 Lectures on Catechesis – from Logia: A Journal of Lutheran Theology

Logia: A Journal of Lutheran Theology has a 7-lecture collection on catechesis. They provide this audio collection either as 7 Mp3 files on CD, or as an Mp3 download.

The collection includes:

If I Had a Hammer-Introduction to Luther’s 95 Theses
Michael Albrecht

Catechetics and the Royal Priesthood
Peter Bender

The Parent: Chief Catechist of the Royal Priesthood
Peter Bender

Confession
Kenneth Korby

5 1/2 Sermons on Catechesis
Kenneth Korby

Liturgy and Catechesis
John T. Pless

The Catechism: Handbook for the Royal Priesthood
John T. Pless

Running time is 8 hours, 11 minutes. Price is $15.00.