Category Archives: Doable

Video — The Lord’s Prayer in a Cardboard Box,

Garrick Matthew Miller Halvorson, aka Gunny, decided he was going to sleep in a cardboard box that night.

Dad still comes in to pray the Lord’s Prayer with him. In the midst of the informality of bedding down in a cardboard box, Gunny still knows what reverence is, and his father shows him that prayer fits in everywhere.

 

Video — Dad and Mom Praying the Lord’s Prayer with Children at Bedtime

Here is a video of Leif and Kim Halvorson praying the Lord’s Prayer with their three children at bedtime.

Dads, as you can see, this takes hardly any time. To be exact, 39 seconds! Yet it has a tremendous impact. It has impact because:

A. The Lord’s Prayer is God’s Word, and God’s Word does stuff. It is quick and powerful. It does not return to the Lord void, but it accomplishes the purpose for which He has sent it.

B. The influence of fathers and mothers is built into nature, and thereafter happens all by itself, simply by your act of doing.

Video – Mom leads young children in closing of daily devotions – Creed, Lord’s Prayer, Reading, and Morning Prayer

This is a third video of home devotions by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

The three videos together illustrate a complete home devotion in the morning The first video showed the opening of daily devotions. The second video showed memory work, with mom helping two young children memorize the Third Article of the Creed, its meaning, the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the First Petition.

Now this video shows the closing of the daily devotion with confessing the Creed, praying the Lord’s prayer, a brief reading for the day, and Dr. Martin Luther’s Morning Prayer from the Small Catechism.

In all, the three videos last only about 16 ½ minutes. From the aspect of time, this is a very doable approach to a daily devotion, and yet in that short amount of time, many things are being learned.

 

Video – Mom helps young children memorize Third Article, Lord’s Prayer Introduction & 1st Petition

This is another encouraging video of home catechization provided to us by our Facebook group member, Melissa Sutton.

In this video, we see that young children can learn to memorize the Catechism. A very young boy recites the Third Article and its meaning. He and his older sister recite the Introduction of the Lord’s Prayer, its meaning, and the Second Petition.

All young children need prompts when learning to recite the Catechism from memory. It is interesting in this video how mom uses both verbal and sign prompts.

Melissa is taking advantage of a pedagogical truth that was expressed by G. H. Gerberding in these words:

The child must be instructed. Begin early. Let it learn to pray as soon as it can speak. … We quote again from Luthardt: ‘Let it not be objected that the child cannot understand the prayer. The way of education is by practice to understanding, not by understanding to practice.

H. Gerberding, The Way of Salvation in the Lutheran Church, pp. 49-50 (Philadelphia: Lutheran Publication Society, 1887).

Even quite young children have some understanding of the words when they first begin to memorize them. After they have the words well fixed in their minds by repeated practice, more and more meaning comes to them.

Video – Mom leads two young children in opening of daily devotions – “Hey, I can do that!”

For many of us, video is such a good way to learn not only how to do things, but more basically, that we can do it.

The thought of fixing our home’s propane furnace intimidated me. But we have YouTube. Seeing it done did two things for me:

1.   It got me over the psychological hump of being fearful I could not do it.

2.   It let me understand some of the terminology and procedures described in written instructions.

These benefits, and more, also happen when we see video of things like Morning Prayer in the home. That is why it is such a blessing that member of our Facebook group, Melissa Sutton, has given us this video of leading her two young children in daily opening devotions.

In this video, you will see a nice, simple order for opening devotions in the home . You will see Melissa and her children incorporate some American Sign Language signs, and some signs the kids made up. Isn’t that neat? The kids make up their own signs!

If you haven’t tried leading devotions with your children, see if, after you watch this video, one of your reactions isn’t, “Hey, I can do that!

Of course, we don’t all have to do it the same way. Melissa shows us a good way. There are others. When our grandchildren visit and stay over, we use the format that Dr. Martin Luther provided in the Small Catechism for Evening Prayer and Morning Prayer. It is very simple, toadaly doable.

In coming days, we also will get the chance to see Melissa with her children in the closing of devotions and in memory work.

 

The Catechism Is a Small Book — Only a Little Time Is Needed to Teach It

“We have spoken of the importance and benefits of home training and instruction. We endeavored to show that Christian parents are under the most solemn obligation to instruct their children in the truth of God’s Word. We also endeavored to show that, in order to give their children a clear understanding of the saving truths of the Bible, they could do no better than to diligently teach them Luther’s Small Catechism; that this was really Luther’s idea and purpose when he wrote that excellent little religious manual; that the first catechetical class ought indeed to be in the family, with father and mother as teachers; that this home class ought to be carried on so long and so persistently, that in it the children would become perfectly familiar with the contents of the book; so familiar indeed, that they would know all the parts that Luther wrote perfectly by heart. Luther’s Small Catechism, i.e., the parts that Luther wrote himself, is really quite a small book. By giving only a little time and attention to it each week, the parents could easily, in a few years, have all their children know it as perfectly as they know their multiplication table, And such ought to be the case.”

G. H. Gerberding, The Way of Salvation in the Lutheran Church, pp. 69-70 (Philadelphia: Lutheran Publication Society, 1887).